Chocolate Covered Raisin Oatmeal Cookies {Gluten Free}

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Nothing beats an oatmeal raisin cookie and a glass of milk– except a chocolate covered raisin oatmeal cookie!

I started to come up with a recipe for an oatmeal raisin cookie, but then I thought, is it really a cookie without chocolate? (obviously, the answer is NO!) And, don’t we all need an extra boost of antioxidants?

Gluten Free Oatmeal Cookies

I used to not bake– because if I did, I would end up sneaking bits of the dough until my stomach hurt, and then I would end up with a sugar crash. I hated that feeling. It just wasn’t worth it.

And then I discovered this whole other realm of healthy baking. Alternative ingredients. Whole grains, natural sugars, and high protein flours. Now, I always have home baked goods in my freezer.

I keep almost all of the baking I do in the freezer. One reason is the less processed, more natural ingredients don’t last as long, and because the sugar in most baked goods acts as a preservative, which my baking does not have. I have also found that frozen cookies are just awesome. The frozen chocolate chips are the best!

Plus, I live in Malaysia, so it takes about 20 seconds flat for a cookie to defrost after being taken out of the freezer.

Chocolate Covered Raisin Cookies

My Favorite Healthy Cookie Recipes (that inspire me in all my baking!)

  1. Irresistible Chewy Trail Mix Cookies, from OhSheGlows
  2. Raspberry Almond Thumbprints, from OhSheGlows
  3. Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies with Pistachios, from Edible Perspective (this cookies are adapted from this recipe!)
  4. Sunflower Seed Butter Oatmeal Sandwich Cookies, from Family Fresh Cooking
  5. Primal Chocolate Chip Cookies, from Elana’s Pantry

Years ago, I found these blogs, and started using their recipes, inspired by the lower amounts of sugar they used.

Then, after I cut refined sugar out of my diet, I found that even these recipes were too sweet for me. I started experimenting with even less sugar (sometimes 1/3 of these already low-sugar recipes), and found that they were plenty sweet. It often takes a little shuffling of ingredients, adding an extra binder, to replace the bulk and binding powers of the sugar, but I much prefer knowing I am getting wholesome ingredients. That way, I can enjoy the cookies.

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

And I can eat them for breakfast (and I do!).

I took these chocolate covered raisin oatmeal cookies to work for a few colleagues last week. The head of maintenance I work with is amazing. A model of efficiency, and always willing to help out. I have been wanting to take him something to thank him for all he does for a while. I also took a container of these to a friend of mine who also eats gluten free. As we were walking the container of cookies down to the maintenance office, I had this sudden realization that he might not like them! Maybe not everyone wants the sugar (mostly) removed from their cookies?

But he did! I heard from him several times how good they were. I blame it on all the sweet chewy raisins, and the satisfying effect of dark chocolate.

Chocolate Covered Raisin Oatmeal Cookies {Gluten-Free}
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
A gluten free and low sugar oatmeal raisin cookies- with dark chocolate! Loaded with chewy raisins, combined melted chocolate, reminiscent of my favorite movie theatre candy- chocolate covered raisins! Adapted from Edible Perspective's Gluten Free Chocolate Pistachio Cookies
Author:
Serves: 45 cookies
Ingredients
Dry
  • 1 cup of oat flour (process whole oats in a food processor until a flour is formed)*
  • 1 cup almond meal or almond flour*
  • 1 cup whole oats
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
Wet
  • ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons coconut oil**
  • ¼ cup natural molasses brown sugar (like sucanat)
  • 2 tablespoons raw honey
  • 2 tablespoons ground flax seed (helps bind)
  • 1 egg
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
Mix-ins
  • ¾ cup raisins (I use half black and half golden)
  • ⅓ cup 85% dark chocolate, chopped
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350º.
  2. Add the dry ingredients together in a mixing bowl, and mix well.
  3. In a smaller bowl, mix together all the wet ingredients. Let stand for 2-3 minutes to allow the flax seed to gel. This helps bind the cookies, since there is so little sugar.
  4. Mix the wet ingredients into the dry, and then add the raisins and chocolate.
  5. Use a round tablespoon to scoop the cookies on to a cookie sheet. Wet the spoons, then pack the cookie dough tightly into the spoon. Place the mounds of cookie dough on a lined or non-stick baking sheet. Alternately, you can form small packed balls of dough.
  6. Using a wet hand (or I like to use the bottom of a glass, wet), flatten the cookies. Because they are low in sugar, they will not spread while baking.
  7. Bake for 9-11 minutes.
  8. Allow to cool for at least 10 minutes before removing from cookie sheet. They will be very crumbly while hot, but will firm up after they've cooled.
  9. For best results, keep frozen. They are extra chewy when eaten out of the freezer, and I prefer the chocolate frozen because it's crunchy!
Notes
*I do not recommend using a store bought oat flour. I've found finely ground oat flour makes cookies grainy and crumbly. Processing oats in a food process or blender is fast, plus, because whole grains have healthy fats that can go rancid, you are ensuring your flour is as fresh as possible.

**I've used butter in place of the coconut oil, and it turns out okay. The flavor is great, but it results in a drier cookie. Generally, I used the two interchangeably, but the coconut oil really is the best choice for these cookies.

I've also added walnuts to several batches. It's a really good idea if you're a nut lover like me!

These cookies disappear fast!

Comment below with any tricks you have for creating low-sugar baked goods! I have another low-sugar “classic” recipe to share next week that I’m really excited. Even less sugar than these!

Low sugar cookies

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